Minoan Lady, Fresco, Akrotiri

Minoan Lady, Fresco, Akrotiri


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File:Minoan fresco, showing a fleet and settlement Akrotiri.jpg

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Contents

The fragments making up the reconstruction at the AMH are, as is usual with these displayed pieces, embedded in plaster of paris on a backing, and framed. There are a total of nine fragments used: [6]

  1. Top of the forehead, part of the ear and hair, and the crown
  2. Torso, including the figure's right arm (viewer's left) and clenched fist. Showing a necklace of waz-lilies.
  3. Biceps, placed on the other arm
  4. Parts of a belt
  5. Parts of a codpiece
  6. Part of a thigh, and a shin (two pieces)
  7. Flat background piece, red and black (restored at bottom)
  8. Flat part of flower (not now in the AMH version)
  9. Flat part restored as butterfly (not now in the AMH version between the lilies and arm at right in the Knossos reproduction)

The reconstruction of the so-called "Priest-king" from Knossos has always been uncertain. When the fragments were excavated under Arthur Evans (not by him personally) in 1901, his first thought was that they belonged to different personages and "the torso may suggest a boxer". [7]

Anatomical observation of this torso shows a contracted powerful musculature and the left disappeared arm was surely in ascendant position because the pectoral muscle is raised. These observations allow us to conclude the torso was one of a boxer resembling the many athletic representations engraved on the Boxer Vase from Hagia Triada. The lily crown belonged to another personage, perhaps a priestess (like on Hagia Triada sarcophagus). The painted reliefs of two athletes boxing in the palace of Knossos were surely the model of the "boxing children" fresco in Akrotiri at Thera. [8]

Evans later changed his mind, and the reconstruction reflects his later idea of the figure as a "Priest-King" he used the image on the cover of all volumes of his main publication on the Knossos excavations, despite the cost of gold-embossing the crown. [9] Evans' change of mind was perhaps largely because he had decided that the original painted wall with the fresco was part of a processional corridor in the palace, and the figure one of a group of others shown in procession, via another corridor, towards the Central Court of the palace, always thought to be the place where bull-leaping took place. In the reconstruction, the rope in the invented hand at right was, Evans thought, leading a sphinx or a griffin a bull being led to a ceremony or sacrifice might be another possibility, but in fact there is no evidence the missing arm held a rope at all. [10]

The fresco griffins from the "Throne Room" wear plumed crowns comparable to the "Priest-King", and if his crown in fact come from another figure, that would be a possibility. In the view of Nanno Marinatos, in Minoan art "the plumed crown" is only worn by deities, griffins and the queen, who is, by definition, also the chief priestess. [11]

The "boxer" idea, for the torso, has resurfaced in recent years, as has an identification as a god. [12] Other suggested reconstructions, that do not combine the piece with the crown with the torso piece, may have the head facing to the viewer's right. [13] The idea of a processional context has been disputed. As to the direction of the head, a careful examination (atop a ladder) by Maria C. Shaw led her to conclude, from the absence of tresses of hair, that at least the restored direction of the head looking to the viewer's left, was correct, which the boxer and god ideas rejected. [14]

Unfortunately, the notes by Duncan Mackenzie, the original excavator in 1901, were not done to modern standards, and in particular leave the exact depth where the fragments were found unclear, as well as raising problems reconciling the exact findspot with Evan's published account. Evans and Mackenzie thought that the fragments were found directly (or nearly so) below their original location on a wall, having been swept, or allowed to fall, down to a basement level after being removed from the wall. [15] Sinclair Hood, a later excavator at Knossos, says that "the fragments were found close below the surface in the much eroded southern region of the palace, and were therefore virtually unstratified". [16]

Gender Edit

As a general rule, Minoan art followed the Ancient Egyptian convention regarding skin colours of "red" (usually more a reddish-brown) for men's flesh and white for women's flesh (also yellow for gold, blue for silver, and red for bronze). The skin of the Prince of the Lilies has most often been interpreted as "red", but some writers have seen it, at least on some fragments, as a white that became dirty when buried. There are also arguments that the colour gender distinction is not invariable in Minoan painting, for example when, as here, the background is a dark red. The elaborate crown may compare better with others on female figures (whether human or griffin) than male ones. [17]

One proposal was that the figure, including the crown, was a female bull-leaper. Two apparent females are shown in the famous Bull-Leaping Fresco from the Knossos palace at any rate the two figures at either end of the bull are a white that contrasts strongly with the "red" one vaulting over the bull, although they may only be wearing loinclothes (again, the lack of most parts leaves gender uncertain). However, it has also been suggested that these "white" figures are also male, and the colour difference perhaps indicates youth or seniority. [18]

Although most figures with crowns are females or griffins, Maria Shaw points to a male tumbler in one of the Minoan frescoes from Tell el-Daba, who wears a (considerably simpler) tailed crown. She suggests that athleticism and "royalty" in a Minoan context may have gone together, with the victors in athletic contests given a special status, even an enduring political one. [19]

Fresco painting was one of the most important forms of Minoan art. Unfortunately, many of the surviving examples are fragmentary. The walls of the great halls of the palaces and houses of Crete were skilfully decorated with frescoes. [20] The paint was applied swiftly while the wall plaster was still wet, so that the colours would be completely absorbed and would not fade. Through the frescoes, one can gain the sense of the character of Minoan life and art and the Minoan joie de vivre. [21] Some frescos were reconstructed between 1450 and 1400 BC, when the Myceneans had established themselves on the island, and exhibit a rather different style. [22]

A stylized version of the fresco is the official logo of the Greek ferry company Minoan Lines.


Minoan Fresco of the Ladies in Blue

Minoan Fresco of the Ladies in Blue depicts the women in the open blouse that was typical in the later Minoan Culture. Their skirts would have begun at the waist, were flounced, and of many colorful patterns.

These fresco fragments were discovered during the excavation of a Minoan site in Crete by the British archaeologist Sir Arthur John Evans.

They were uncovered in the west wing of the Palace of Knossos. The fresco was later significantly restored by Swiss artist Emile Gilliéron and his son, Emile, as the chief fresco restorers at Knossos.

The three white-skinned ladies with narrow waists and coiled hairstyles in this fresco are wearing form-fitting dresses that were low-cut and exposed their breasts.

The ladies with the graceful posture of their arms are depicted while conversating with each other, perhaps during a court festival or a prestigious social or religious ceremony.

The women in the fresco belong to the upper class of Minoan society. They might be goddesses as in the Snake Goddess example or just noble ladies of the court.

In Minoan iconography, the shift from the hat to the long hair and elaborate hairdressings is predominant in the New Palace Period.

High-status women stressed the display of the head to differentiate themselves from the women using hats as part of their attire.

This stylistic change served to promote the dominant groups of women that emerged in the Neopalatial Period who wished to differentiate themselves from the rest of women.

They are elaborately adorned with delicate necklaces, bracelets, and hair ornaments in a display of the wealth of the Minoan court.

Although this fresco is a striking piece of ancient artwork, it has some controversy attached to it, since it is not certain what were the details of the original composition.

Despite the elaborate details of the fresco, the fragmentary nature of the ancient remains is a restoration challenge for many of the murals from the Palace of Knossos.

The reconstructed fresco is on display at the Heraklion Archaeological Museum in Crete.

The writer Evelyn Waugh after a visit to the Museum in 1929, state that it is not easy to judge the merits of Minoan painting as:

“It is impossible to disregard the suspicion that their painters have tempered their zeal for accurate reconstruction with a somewhat inappropriate predilection for the covers of Vogue.”

Wall painting of the dancing lady from Knossos, Queen’s Megaron – Archaeological Museum of Heraklion.

Minoan Dress

Initially, in the Minoan culture, the loincloth was used by both sexes. Then later in Minoan civilization, the women of Minoan Crete wore the garment more as an underskirt than the men, by lengthening it.

Cretan women’s clothing included the first sewn garments known to history. Wool and flax were used. Fabrics were embroidered, and crimson was used for most of the dyeing.

With increasing affluence, the dresses grew long and low-necked, with the bodice being open almost to the waist, leaving the breasts exposed.

Dresses were often accompanied by the Minoan corset, an early form of corset created as a close-fitting blouse. They were designed to narrow the waist, as a narrow waist was prized in Minoan culture.

The belt was also kept tight and used to narrow the waist before the corset, a long or short coat, or a hat was used to supplement the female outfit.

Minoan clothes in ancient times were well documented in their artwork, mainly the many items worn by priestesses and priests.

Spinning and weaving were domestic activities, using a similar technique to the Egyptians of the time, and dyeing was the only commercial process in keeping with practices during the time.

Ancient brooches, which were widespread in the Mediterranean, were also used throughout the period.

Minoan women

As Minoan writing has not been deciphered yet, almost all information available about Minoan women is from various art forms.

Women are depicted in fresco art paintings within various aspects of society, such as child-rearing, ritual participation, and worshiping.

Artistically, women were portrayed very differently compared to the representations of men. Most obviously, men were often artistically represented with dark skin while women were depicted with lighter, fairer skin.

Fresco paintings portray three class levels of women elite women, women of the masses, and servants. The fourth class of women also included among some pictures these women are those who participated in religious and sacred tasks.

Elite women were depicted within paintings as having twice the size of women in lower classes, and artistically this was a way of emphasizing the vital difference between the elite wealthy women and the rest of the female population within society.

Minoan men were often depicted clad in little clothing while women’s bodies, in later periods, were more conservatively covered up.

While there is evidence that women’s clothing originated as similar clothing that men wore, fresco art illustrates how women’s clothing evolved to be more elaborate as Minoan culture evolved.

Throughout the evolution of women’s clothing, emphasis continued to be placed on the women’s sexual characteristics, particularly the breasts.

Female clothing throughout the Minoan era emphasized the breasts by exposing cleavage or even the entire breast. Similarly, to the modern bodice women continue to wear today, Minoan women were portrayed with wasp waists.

The waist of women was constricted, made smaller by a high belt or a tight lace bodice. Furthermore, not only women but men are illustrated wearing these accessories.

Minoan Frescos

Minoan art is the art produced by the Minoan civilization from about 2600 to 1100 BC.

The Minoan Frescos were painted on stucco relief scenes and are classified as plastic art. They were challenging to produce as the artist had to simultaneous mold and painting of fresh stucco.

Frescoes are the stereotypical type of Art depicting Minoan culture. Several significant frescoes at Knossos and Santorini survive.

In contrast to Egyptian frescoes, Crete had more naturalistic murals. Probably the most famous fresco is the bull-leaping fresco.

They include many depictions of people, with sexes distinguished by color the men’s skin is reddish-brown, and the women’s white.

The most extensive collection of Minoan art is in the Heraklion Archaeological Museum, near Knossos, on the northern coast of Crete.

Reproduction of the “Ladies in Blue” fresco – MET

Minoan Art

Minoan Art and other remnants of material culture, especially the sequence of ceramic styles, have been used by archaeologists to define the three phases of Minoan civilization:

  • Early Minoan (EM) – ceramics were characterized by patterns of spirals, triangles, curved lines, crosses, fish bones, and beak-spouts.
  • Middle Minoan (MM) – designs of Minoan pottery ware are typically executed in white, red, and blue on a black field. Typical designs include abstract floral motifs.
  • Late Minoan (LM) – flowers and animals were still characteristic but with greater variety. Floral, Marine, Abstract Geometric, and the Alternating styles of decoration were prominent themes of this era.

Since wood and textiles have decomposed, the best-preserved surviving examples of Minoan art are its pottery, palace architecture with frescos, which include landscapes, and stone carvings.

Today’s frescos are reconstructed from the flakes of the damaged panels from the walls or that fell to the ground from the destruction of the palace.

The destruction was probably due to an earthquake during the Late Minoan period. By that time, that part of the palace, near which they fell, was disused, being partly ruinous.

Minoan Civilization

The Minoan civilization was a Bronze Age Aegean civilization on the island of Crete and some other Aegean Islands, flourishing from c. about 3000 BC to around 1100 BC.

The Minoan civilization is considered the first advanced civilization in Europe, leaving behind massive building complexes, tools, artwork, writing systems, and a network of trade.

The civilization was rediscovered at the beginning of the 20th century through the work of British archaeologist Sir Arthur Evans.

The name “Minoan” derived from the mythical King Minos and was coined by Evans, who identified the site at Knossos with the labyrinth and the Minotaur.

The Minoan civilization is particularly notable for its extensive and elaborate palaces up to four stories high, featuring decorations with frescoes.

Through their traders and artists, the Minoans’ cultural influence reached beyond Crete to the Cyclades, the Old Kingdom of Egypt, copper-bearing Cyprus, Canaan, and the Levantine coast and Anatolia.

Some of the best Minoan art is preserved in the city of Akrotiri on the island of Santorini, which was destroyed by the Minoan eruption.

The reasons for the decline of the Minoan civilization are unclear, though theories include Mycenaean invasions from mainland Greece and the major volcanic eruption of Santorini.

“Camp-stool Fresco” – Ceremonial banqueting from the west wing of the palace of Knossos – Archaeological Museum of Heraklion.

Knossos

Knossos is the largest Bronze Age archaeological site on Crete and has been called Europe’s oldest city.

Settled as early as the Neolithic period, the name Knossos survives from ancient Greek references. The palace of Knossos eventually became the ceremonial and political center of the Minoan civilization and culture.

The palace was abandoned at some time at the end of the Late Bronze Age, c. 1,380–1,100 BC, the reason why is unknown.

In its peak, the palace and surrounding city boasted a population of 100,000 people shortly after 1,700 BC.

In Greek mythology, King Minos dwelt in a palace at Knossos. He had Daedalus construct a labyrinth, a vast maze in which to retain his son, the Minotaur. The name “Knossos” was adopted for the site by English archaeologist Arthur Evans.

Arthur Evans

Arthur Evans (1851 – 1941) was an English archaeologist and pioneer in the study of Aegean civilization in the Bronze Age. He is most famous for unearthing the palace of Knossos on the Greek island of Crete.

Based on the structures and artifacts found there and throughout the eastern Mediterranean, Evans found that he needed to distinguish the Minoan civilization from Mycenaean Greece.

Evans was also the first to define Cretan scripts Linear A and Linear B, as well as earlier pictographic writing.

By 1903, most of the ruins of Knossos Palace were excavated, bringing to light an advanced city containing artwork and many examples of writing.

After he finished excavations, Evans proceeded to have one of the palace rooms called the throne room due to the throne-like stone chair fixed in the room repainted.

Arthur Evans hired Swiss artist Emile Gilliéron and his son, Emile, as the chief fresco restorers at Knossos.

While Evans based the recreations on archaeological evidence, some of the best-known frescoes from the throne room were recreated as a best guess rather than any scientific analysis, as that was not available at the time.

More recently, Spyridon Marinatos unearthed the ancient site at Santorini, which included Minoan frescoes, which make it the second-most famous Minoan site.


Minoan Lady, Fresco, Akrotiri - History

GIS Google Earth
Publications

  • Theoretical Bronze Age Minoan Heliographic Aegean Network Validated by 92.15 Mile (148.3 Km) Mirror Sunlight Flashes
  • The Validation of a Bronze Age Minoan Heliographic Aegean Network in Southern California
  • Tsunami Generation from the Titanic Bronze Age Minoan Eruption of the Santorini Marine Volcano
  • The Cento Camerelle Mines of Tuscany: A Major Bronze Age Source of Tin
  • No Men or Sails Required: Successful Prehistoric Sea Travel
  • Minoan Downfall and Volcanology's Black Hole of Unknowns
  • Homer and Navigating by the Stars in Prehistory
  • Primacy of Human Powered Rowing in Copper Age and Minoan Shipping
  • Minoan Invention of the True Dome and Arch Prehistoric Mediterranean Catenary Architecture
  • "Sinking Atlantis" Tsunami Myth Debunked
  • Minoan Tholos Structural Mechanics and the Garlo Well Temple
  • Minoan Web of Mirrors and Scripts
  • Santorini Eruption and LM IB Destruction
  • Minoan Catastrophe: Pyroclastic Surge Theory
  • Early Minoan Colonization of Spain
  • Origin of the Sea Peoples
  • Minoan Ship Construction
  • Minoan Maritime Navigation
  • Ringed Islands of Thera, Santorini, Greece
  • Minoan Scientific Tradition

A Collection of 20 Paintings each with over 70 Art Products

Over 1,400 Art Items Available

Shipping from Fulfillment Centers in Australia, Canada, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, UK, and the USA.

1613 BC
West House, Room 5, South Wall
Akrotiri, Santorini (Thera), Greece

RedBubble Image Specifications
RB Max Image Size in Pixels: 182.25 MegaPixels

Minoan Flotilla Thera Scene Fresco Specifications
Resolution: 300 Pixels/Inch, 118.11 Pixels/Cm
Width: 16,400 Pixels, 54.7 Inches, 138.9 Cms
Height: 11,072 Pixels, 36.9 Inches, 93.7 Cms
Total: 181,580,800 Pixels, 99.63 % of RB Max Image Size

 RedBubble is based in San Francisco, California, USA and Melbourne, Victoria, Australia and has an excellent array of the highest quality art products - Apparel - Premium T-Shirt, Premium Scoop T-Shirt, Slim Fit T-Shirt, Fitted T-Shirt, Lightweight Hoodie, Long T-Shirt, Hoodie (Pullover), Classic T-Shirt, Tri-blend T-Shirt, Graphic T-Shirt, Chiffon Top, Sleeveless Top, Graphic T-Shirt Dress, A-Line Dress, Fitted Scoop T-Shirt, Fitted V-Neck T-Shirt, Relaxed Fit T-Shirt, Leggings, Mini Skirt, Lightweight Sweatshirt, Active T-Shirt - Cases & Skins - iPhone Case/Skin, Case/Skin for Samsung Galaxy, iPad Case/Skin, Laptop Skin, Laptop Sleeve - Wall Art - Poster, Canvas Print, Photographic Print, Art Board Print, Art Print, Framed Print, Metal Print, Canvas Mounted Print, Wood Mounted Print - Home Decor - Throw Pillow, Floor Pillow, Mug, Clock, Acrylic Block, Tapestry, Throw Blanket, Duvet Cover, Comforter, Bath Mat, Shower Curtain, Coasters - Accessories - Drawstring Bag, Scarf, Tote Bag, Travel Mug, Zipper Pouch, Water Bottle, Socks, Pin Button, Mask, Backpack, Duffel Bag - Stationery - Sticker, Greeting Card, Spiral Notebook, Hardcover Journal.

The focus of this closeup view of the Miniature Frieze "Flotilla" Fresco is the island of Thera on the left side of the composition. This is a contemporary view of the ringed island before the great Bronze Age eruption of the Santorini marine volvano. It clearly shows an inner island ringed by water in the middle of the caldera with a large palace complex dominating the scene.


Map of Location where the
Minoan Miniature Frieze Admirals Flotilla Fresco
was Discovered
West House, Room 5, South Wall
Akrotiri, Santorini (Thera), Greece

Minoan Miniature Frieze Admirals Flotilla Fresco
in Three Panels
Late Bronze Age (LBA)
Neo-Palatial Late Minoan I Period
The West House, Room 5, South Wall
3.90 x 0.43 meters
Akrotiri, Santorini (Thera), Greece.


File history

Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time.

Date/TimeThumbnailDimensionsUserComment
current23:41, 30 January 2006640 × 432 (248 KB) Rainer Zenzfresco of minoan Akrotiri, Santorini, Greece <> Category:Akrotiri Category:Minoan culture


Minoan Lady, Fresco, Akrotiri - History

GIS Google Earth
Publications

  • Theoretical Bronze Age Minoan Heliographic Aegean Network Validated by 92.15 Mile (148.3 Km) Mirror Sunlight Flashes
  • The Validation of a Bronze Age Minoan Heliographic Aegean Network in Southern California
  • Tsunami Generation from the Titanic Bronze Age Minoan Eruption of the Santorini Marine Volcano
  • The Cento Camerelle Mines of Tuscany: A Major Bronze Age Source of Tin
  • No Men or Sails Required: Successful Prehistoric Sea Travel
  • Minoan Downfall and Volcanology's Black Hole of Unknowns
  • Homer and Navigating by the Stars in Prehistory
  • Primacy of Human Powered Rowing in Copper Age and Minoan Shipping
  • Minoan Invention of the True Dome and Arch Prehistoric Mediterranean Catenary Architecture
  • "Sinking Atlantis" Tsunami Myth Debunked
  • Minoan Tholos Structural Mechanics and the Garlo Well Temple
  • Minoan Web of Mirrors and Scripts
  • Santorini Eruption and LM IB Destruction
  • Minoan Catastrophe: Pyroclastic Surge Theory
  • Early Minoan Colonization of Spain
  • Origin of the Sea Peoples
  • Minoan Ship Construction
  • Minoan Maritime Navigation
  • Ringed Islands of Thera, Santorini, Greece
  • Minoan Scientific Tradition

A Collection of 20 Paintings each with over 70 Art Products

Over 1,400 Art Items Available

Shipping from Fulfillment Centers in Australia, Canada, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, UK, and the USA.

1613 BC
West House, Room 5, South Wall
Akrotiri, Santorini (Thera), Greece

RedBubble Image Specifications
RB Max Image Size in Pixels: 182.25 MegaPixels

Minoan Flotilla Thera Scene Restoration Fresco Specifications
Resolution: 300 Pixels/Inch, 118.11 Pixels/Cm
Width: 16,400 Pixels, 54.7 Inches, 138.9 Cms
Height: 11,069 Pixels, 36.9 Inches, 93.7 Cms
Total: 181,531,600 Pixels, 99.61 % of RB Max Image Size

 RedBubble is based in San Francisco, California, USA and Melbourne, Victoria, Australia and has an excellent array of the highest quality art products - Apparel - Premium T-Shirt, Premium Scoop T-Shirt, Slim Fit T-Shirt, Fitted T-Shirt, Lightweight Hoodie, Long T-Shirt, Hoodie (Pullover), Classic T-Shirt, Tri-blend T-Shirt, Graphic T-Shirt, Chiffon Top, Sleeveless Top, Graphic T-Shirt Dress, A-Line Dress, Fitted Scoop T-Shirt, Fitted V-Neck T-Shirt, Relaxed Fit T-Shirt, Leggings, Mini Skirt, Lightweight Sweatshirt, Active T-Shirt - Cases & Skins - iPhone Case/Skin, Case/Skin for Samsung Galaxy, iPad Case/Skin, Laptop Skin, Laptop Sleeve - Wall Art - Poster, Canvas Print, Photographic Print, Art Board Print, Art Print, Framed Print, Metal Print, Canvas Mounted Print, Wood Mounted Print - Home Decor - Throw Pillow, Floor Pillow, Mug, Clock, Acrylic Block, Tapestry, Throw Blanket, Duvet Cover, Comforter, Bath Mat, Shower Curtain, Coasters - Accessories - Drawstring Bag, Scarf, Tote Bag, Travel Mug, Zipper Pouch, Water Bottle, Socks, Pin Button, Mask, Backpack, Duffel Bag - Stationery - Sticker, Greeting Card, Spiral Notebook, Hardcover Journal.

This is the first precision restoration of a scene from the Miniature Frieze "Flotilla" Fresco. It depicts a detailed view of the ringed islands of Thera just before the great Bronze Age eruption of the Santorini marine volcano. It was derived from multiple original sources but especially from the superb publication "The Wall-Paintings of Thera" by Christos Doumas. While it represents a minimalist effort to accurately display the artist's original intention some areas of the fresco were so damaged that some degree of subjective interpretation was required to complete it. It clearly shows an inner island ringed by water in the middle of the caldera with a palace complex or town dominating the scene.

All restorations were derived by using as objective and rigorous of a methodology as possible. I didn't want my biases or psychological preferences to subjectively "color" the effort. All my restorations use the same precision methodology. My only motivation was to do my best to reveal what they would have looked like when freshly painted.


Map of Location where the
Minoan Miniature Frieze Admirals Flotilla Fresco
was Discovered
West House, Room 5, South Wall
Akrotiri, Santorini (Thera), Greece

Minoan Miniature Frieze Admirals Flotilla Fresco
in Three Panels
Late Bronze Age (LBA)
Neo-Palatial Late Minoan I Period
The West House, Room 5, South Wall
3.90 x 0.43 meters
Akrotiri, Santorini (Thera), Greece.


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Minoan Lady, Fresco, Akrotiri - History

GIS Google Earth
Publications

  • Theoretical Bronze Age Minoan Heliographic Aegean Network Validated by 92.15 Mile (148.3 Km) Mirror Sunlight Flashes
  • The Validation of a Bronze Age Minoan Heliographic Aegean Network in Southern California
  • Tsunami Generation from the Titanic Bronze Age Minoan Eruption of the Santorini Marine Volcano
  • The Cento Camerelle Mines of Tuscany: A Major Bronze Age Source of Tin
  • No Men or Sails Required: Successful Prehistoric Sea Travel
  • Minoan Downfall and Volcanology's Black Hole of Unknowns
  • Homer and Navigating by the Stars in Prehistory
  • Primacy of Human Powered Rowing in Copper Age and Minoan Shipping
  • Minoan Invention of the True Dome and Arch Prehistoric Mediterranean Catenary Architecture
  • "Sinking Atlantis" Tsunami Myth Debunked
  • Minoan Tholos Structural Mechanics and the Garlo Well Temple
  • Minoan Web of Mirrors and Scripts
  • Santorini Eruption and LM IB Destruction
  • Minoan Catastrophe: Pyroclastic Surge Theory
  • Early Minoan Colonization of Spain
  • Origin of the Sea Peoples
  • Minoan Ship Construction
  • Minoan Maritime Navigation
  • Ringed Islands of Thera, Santorini, Greece
  • Minoan Scientific Tradition

A Collection of 20 Paintings each with over 70 Art Products

Over 1,400 Art Items Available

Shipping from Fulfillment Centers in Australia, Canada, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, UK, and the USA.

1613 BC
Beta Sector, Room 1, West Wall
2.0 Meters (6.6 Ft) x 2.75 Meters (9.0 Ft)
Akrotiri, Santorini (Thera), Greece

RedBubble Image Specifications
RB Max Image Size in Pixels: 182.25 MegaPixels

Minoan Antelope Restoration Fresco Specifications
Resolution: 300 Pixels/Inch, 118.11 Pixels/Cm
Width: 11,703 Pixels, 39.0 Inches, 99.1 Cms
Height: 15,400 Pixels, 51.3 Inches, 130.4 Cms
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This fresco was found during the excavations conducted by Spyridon Marinatos from 1967 to 1974 at Akrotiri on the southern coast of the ringed islands of Santorini (the Pompeii of the Aegean) which was covered by thick deposits of ash and pumice from the great Bronze Age eruption of the Santorini volcano that occurred between 1627 and 1600 BC. It was discovered on the west wall of room 1 in the Beta Sector and is 2.0 meters (6.6 feet) wide and 2.75 meters (9.0 feet) high. This exquisite fresco is on display at the National Archaeological Museum in Athens.

The Beta Sector not only contained the famous wall paintings of the Antelopes and the Boxing Boys but also included the “Fresco of the Monkeys” which depicted monkeys climbing on rocks near a river.

All restorations were derived by using as objective and rigorous of a methodology as possible. I didn't want my biases or psychological preferences to subjectively "color" the effort. All my restorations use the same precision methodology. My only motivation was to do my best to reveal what they would have looked like when freshly painted.


Map of Location where the
Minoan Antelopes Fresco
was Discovered
Beta Sector, Room 1, West Wall
Akrotiri, Santorini (Thera), Greece

Boxing Boys and Antelopes Frescoes
of Room 1 in the Beta Sector
Akrotiri, Santorini (Thera), Greece


File:The Antelopes Fresco, from Akrotiri, Thera (Santorini), Minoan Civilization, 16th Century BC, National Archaeological Museum of Athens (14115163145).jpg

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Watch the video: Prehistoric Town of Akrotiri, Santorini, Greece


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